Publications
Back to browse results
 
INEQUITIES IN UTILISATION OF MATERNAL HEALTH INTERVENTIONS IN NAMIBIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR PROGRESS TOWARDS MDG 5 TARGETS
Authors: Zere E, Tumusiime P, Walker O, Kirigia J, Mwikisa C And Mbeeli T
Source: International Journal for Equity in Health, 9(16), 12 June 2010
Topic(s): Inequality
Maternal health
Country: Africa
  Namibia
Published: JUN 2010
Abstract: The objective of this study is to measure socio-economic inequalities in access to maternal health services in Namibia and propose recommendations relevant for policy and planning. Data from the Namibia Demographic and Health Survey 2006-07 was analysed for inequities in the utilisation of maternal health. Regions with relatively high human development index were found to have the highest rates of delivery by skilled health service providers. The rate of caesarean section in women with post secondary education is about seven times that of women with no education. Women in urban areas are delivered by skilled providers 30% more than their rural counterparts. High-income households use the public health facilities 30% more than poor households for child delivery. The paper concludes that, in the presence of inequities, it is difficult to achieve a significant reduction in the maternal mortality ratio needed to realise the Millennium Development Goal 5 targets. This is not achievable if a large segment of society has inadequate access to essential maternal health services and other basic social services.
Web: http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/pdf/1475-9276-9-16.pdf