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Document Type
Further Analysis
Publication Topic(s)
Family Planning, Fertility and Fertility Preferences, Maternal Health, Maternal Mortality
Country(s)
Nepal
Language
English
Recommended Citation
Pant, Prakesh Dev, Bal Krishna Suvedi, Ajit Pradhan, Lisa Hulton, Zoe Matthew, and Mahesh Maskey. 2008. Improvements in Maternal Health in Nepal: Further Analysis of the 2006 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey. DHS Further Analysis Reports No. 54. Calverton, Maryland, USA: Macro International
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Publication ID
FA54

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Abstract:

In July 2007 the results of the 2006 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS)were published. The results suggested a halving of the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from the 1996 NDHS. The new figures indicate that maternal mortality is now as low as 281 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. In 1996, the NDHS found an MMR of 539 maternal deaths per 100,000 lives births. Despite these measured improvements, 82 percent of women still give birth at home in Nepal without the presence of a skilled birth attendant (SBA). This study examines trends in maternal mortality, use of maternal health services, and socio-demographic changes in Nepal using the results of three successive DHS surveys from 1996 to 2006. It draws on supporting evidence from national health service statistics from the Nepal Health Management Information System (HMIS), and indicators from Nepali facilities on emergency obstetric care, which were collected in 13 of 75 districts over the period of interest. Additional sources of data for this study are derived from the records of the Ministry of Health as well as recent budget surveys that record information on household expenditure on health. Problems of under-reporting and inaccuracy are associated with all of these data sources, but by using the information in combination, it is possible to build up a reasonably good impression of the progress in maternal health in Nepal.