Publications
Browse

Browse for Publications by:

Browse for Journal Articles based on DHS data by:

orange publication summary banner small

Document Type
Working Papers
Country(s)
Ethiopia
Language
English
Recommended Citation
Mehari, Asmeret Moges. 2013. Levels and Determinants of Use of Institutional Delivery Care Services among Women of Childbearing Age in Ethiopia: Analysis of EDHS 2000 and 2005 Data. DHS Working Papers No. 83. Calverton, Maryland, USA: ICF International.
Download Citation
RIS format / Text format / Endnote format
Publication ID
WP83

Order a Hard Copy: Please use electronic copies of DHS publications whenever possible. Hardcopies of publications are intended primarily for those in developing countries where internet connections are limited or unavailable.

Abstract:

In Ethiopia, the proportion of births that occur at home remains high, and skilled health professionals attend very few births. Considering these facts, this study examined factors determining institutional delivery care service utilization in Ethiopia, using data from two rounds of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in Ethiopia (2000 and 2005). Using the binomial logistic regression model, the study showed that women residing in urban areas, women with secondary and higher education, and women from the wealthiest households were most likely to utilize delivery care services. In addition, the study found that four or more antenatal visits and birth order of children were significant predictors of institutional delivery. Further, the study showed that delivery service utilization did not change significantly between the two survey years. Based on these findings, it can be recommended that there should be progress toward a health education program that enables more women to utilize maternal health care services, including delivery care. To meet the goal, this program should target specific groups, including rural and uneducated women, through appropriate media. It should also target mothers with higher birth orders and should encourage more use of antenatal care during pregnancy. Finally, improvement in the socioeconomic status of women is crucial to enabling more women to seek care during pregnancy and delivery.