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Factors associated with underweight, overweight, and obesity in reproductive age Tanzanian women
Authors: Kedir Y. Ahmed, Abdon G. Rwabilimbo, Solomon Abrha, Andrew Page, Amit Arora, Fentaw Tadese, Tigistu Yemane Beyene, Abdulaziz Seiko, Abdulhafiz A. Endris, Kingsley E. Agho, Felix Akpojene Ogbo, and on behalf of the Global Maternal and Child Health Research collaboration (GloMACH)
Source: PLoS ONE , 15(8): e0237720; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0237720
Topic(s): Nutrition
Women's health
Country: Africa
  Tanzania
Published: AUG 2020
Abstract: BACKGROUND:Underweight, overweight, and obesity are major public health challenges among reproductive-age women of lower- and middle-income countries (including Tanzania). In those settings, obesogenic factors (attributes that promote excessive body weight gain) are increasing in the context of an existing high burden of undernutrition. The present study investigated factors associated with underweight, overweight, and obesity among reproductive age women in Tanzania. METHODS:This study used 2015-16 Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey data (n = 11735). To account for the hierarchical nature of the data (i.e., reproductive age women nested within clusters), multilevel multinomial logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between individual-level (socioeconomic, demographic and behavioural) and community-level factors with underweight, overweight, and obesity. RESULTS:Reproductive age women who were informally employed (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64, 0.96), those who were currently married (RRR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.82) and those who used contraceptives (RRR = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.90) were less likely to be underweight. Reproductive age women who attained secondary or higher education (RRR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.11, 1.96), those who resided in wealthier households (RRR = 2.31; 95% CI: 1.78, 3.03) and those who watched the television (RRR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.50) were more likely to be overweight. The risk of experiencing obesity was higher among reproductive age women who attained secondary or higher education (RRR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.61), those who were formally employed (RRR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.98), those who resided in wealthier households (RRR = 4.77; 95% CI: 3.03, 7.50), those who used alcohol (RRR = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.82) and/or watched the television (RRR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.35, 2.13). CONCLUSION:Our study suggests that relevant government jurisdictions need to identify, promote, and implement evidence-based interventions that can simultaneously address underweight and overweight/obesity among reproductive age women in Tanzania.
Web: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0237720